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Trending: Best Places to Buy Ammo Online and [Buyer's Guide] 7 Best AR-15s While the ATF tried to re-categorize the 5. 56 M855 ammo as armor piercing (update: it didn’t work), the heavier hitting military surplus 30-06 M2 AP round is still currently legal at the federal level. Disclaimer: I’m not a lawyer, so check all your federal, state, & local laws.

30-06 M2 AP Armor Piercing Penetration Tests

30-06 M2 AP Armor Piercing Penetration TestsTrending: Best Places to Buy Ammo Online and [Buyer's Guide] 7 Best AR-15s While the ATF tried to re-categorize the 5.56 M855 ammo as armor piercing (update: it didn’t work), the heavier hitting military surplus 30-06 M2 AP round is still currently legal at the federal level. Disclaimer: I’m not a lawyer, so check all your federal, state, & local laws.  Some states/cities have different criteria on AP ammo. Black Tip 30-06 M2 AP What is 30-06 M2 AP ammo? M2 AP ammo is military surplus ammo from WWII chambered for the 30-06.  It’s also known as “black tip” because of the black paint on its tip.  The ammo used to be in plentiful supply but now that it’s 60-70 years after final production, it is getting much harder to find. Below shows the size of the penetrator relative to the overall round. M2 AP Penetrator M2 AP in Action The 30-06 is already a proven battle rifle round, how does it do with armor piercing capabilities?  Spoiler alert, it goes through a lot of wood and steel and even some AR500. M2 AP in 308? If you’re a reloader, you might be realizing that you can take the bullets from the 30-06 M2 AP and reload them into 308 cartridges. This again is another disclaimer area since some states/cities do not allow any AP ammo and it could be construed as manufacturing AP ammo which is a definite no-no. So of course, here’s some M2 AP in 308 footage: Although the 308 is less powerful than the 30-06, it still did well by going almost all the way through 1 inch steel. Black Tip 308 Where Do I Buy M2 AP Ammo? We’ve searched far and wide and here’s the places that currently have M2 AP: Ammo Garand : $30-40 for a box of 20 Gun Broker : Around $2 each, but has pulled bullets for about $1 each

13 Survival Tips You Should NOT Follow

13 Survival Tips You Should NOT Follow

Between survival television shows, online videos, movies, blogs, novels, magazines, the appearance of new survival experts, and oldwives tales, there is a huge amount of information out there as it pertains to survival situations. A lot of it is good. And a lot of it is bad. When it comes to survival tips many of them and the reasoning behind them sound good. And to be fair, in some circumstances they may have some value. The problem arises when we take these tips at face value without using critical thinking skills. This becomes even more problematic in a survival situation where fear, hunger, thirst, injuries, and overall fatigue can easily cloud one’s judgment. I decided to put together a list of popular survival tips that have some merit and ones that I flat out will not follow. Quick Navigation Survival Tips To NOT Follow 1. Turning your knife into a spear 2. You must get a fire going 3. Baton cutting wood with a knife 4. Moss always grows on the north side of trees 5. Don’t Drink Unfiltered Water 6. Always travel downhill or downstream 7. Follow signs of civilization 8. Do not travel at night 9. Going after prey that can hurt you 10. Eating wild berries 11. Drinking urine 12. Finding food right away 13. Friction fires are easy In the End Follow Critical Thinking Survival Tips To NOT Follow 1. Turning your knife into a spear This one drives me up a wall. At some point in almost every survival show this rears its ugly little head. The host shows you how to make a spear by lashing their knife to the end of a stick. Usually this is to create a defensive weapon to create distance between them and predators in the area. Great, so I should take one of the most important survival tools I have, tie it to the end of a stick and use it to ward off lions, tigers, and bears? (oh my) If I do encounter a predator and use this tool there is a good chance of losing my knife. Plus, if there are sturdy enough sticks around to do this why not use the knife to carve a spear point on the end of the stick and keep my knife safe? 2. You must get a fire going Okay so this one certainly has value to it, but critical thinking must be used. There is a multitude of benefits to getting a fire going that I will not get into because we all know them. The problem arises when someone thinks they must create fire to survive the night. The truth of the matter is if you have decent clothing, can shield yourself from the elements and the environment is not too harsh, you will most likely survive the night. You need to know your limits when it comes to wasting precious resources, time, and energy on fire versus finding shelter . 3. Baton cutting wood with a knife This is another one that kind of makes my eye twitch. For some reason it has become popular to use a heavy branch or log to beat on the spine of a knife in order to drive it through another piece of wood. It seems the main purpose of this is to create kindling for a fire. There is absolutely no need for that, and I do not fully understand it. Knives simply are not meant to be used seriously in that manner. Using a knife like this dramatically increases the chances of it breaking. I apologize for repeating myself, but a knife is one of the most important tools to have in a survival situation. Why would I want to risk breaking it? The answer is I would not. 4. Moss always grows on the north side of trees I have heard this one off and on ever since I was a kid. It is one of those sayings that initially sounds good and yes, I have seen moss grow on the north side of trees. I have also seen it grow on the south, east and west side. Not to mention some trees that have moss growing around the entire trunk. Moss will grow on the side of a tree that is most favorable to growing conditions. This is not a tip to fully rely on. 5. Don’t "Drink Unfiltered Water" I am probably going to get into some hot water (no pun intended) on this one but let me first say that I am not advocating the practice of drinking unfiltered water in the wild. What I am advocating is the use of critical thinking skills. Before explaining, make sure to read the different urban myths about drinking water in the wild . Here is a scenario. I have a source of water in front of me and it is the only water available. I have zero means of filtering or boiling it. I know that the most common pathogens in this region will not affect me for several days. I also know that beyond a shadow of a doubt help is only a two-day hike away. Lastly, I am beyond dehydrated. So, I have two options. Number one is to not drink the water and risk dying from dehydration. Number two is to drink the water so that I can walk out and then seek medical treatment. Again, as a rule you should not drink unfiltered water. But if you have intimate knowledge of the region you can decide what is best for you. 6. Always travel downhill or downstream Traveling downhill or downstream offers certain opportunities over higher altitude and civilization is generally located along water ways But critical thinking skills must be used. If you know help is located a few miles upstream why would you travel 15 miles downstream? 7. Follow signs of civilization This completely depends on your knowledge of the region. Should you come upon a railroad track, an old dirt road or some other form of civilization, you must ask yourself one question. Should I follow these signs or continue a known path to safety? A railroad track could continue for hundreds of miles before reaching a safe point. Whereas continuing your current path could lead you to safety within a few miles. Always take a moment to think about your situation before blindly following the most comfortable path. 8. Do not travel at night Traveling at night obviously has certain dangers that daylight travel does not have. Primarily you cannot see as well. There is an increase opportunity for injury and stumbling into a predator’s territory. However, in extremely hot regions nighttime travel may be a more efficient option. The cooler temperatures will allow you to faster travel without using up as much water or the fear of heatstroke. 9. Going after prey that can hurt you This is something that needs to be considered more as it relates to your energy levels and capabilities. For instance, most freshwater fish do not pose much of a physical threat to you when they are fished for. Whereas a bear, deer, or boar, can put you down for the count. I once walked up to a whitetail deer that I thought was dead. Unfortunately for me, it still had some life left in it and a quick hoof to the chest put me on my back. Luckily, I only had the wind knocked out of me and walked away with just a bruise. Do not let hunger get the best of you. Think about the possible consequences of what you choose to go after before putting yourself in the danger zone. 10. Eating wild berries When asked what you would eat if you were lost in the woods, I still hear people say, “berries and stuff.” The fact of the matter is that if you know your wild edibles and you are in a favorable part of the season then there should be no reason for you to go hungry in the woods. However, the sad truth of the matter is that most people do not know their wild edibles so they risk eating poisonous food. 11. Drinking urine Um, no. Just no . Urine has waste products that the body is trying to get rid of. By drinking it, the waste products become more concentrated in the body causing dehydration to occur faster. I have heard the argument that urine is sterile, and it is made up of mainly water. Do you know what else is mainly made of water? Sea water. But we don’t’ encourage people to drink salt water. Additionally, there is the risk of vomiting when trying to consume your own waste products, which causes further dehydration. 12. Finding food right away We can survive for three plus weeks without food. While you should always keep your eye out for food sources along the way, I do not think it is a priority to catch food early on. Priority issues include finding water, maintaining core body temperature, getting a fire going, and coming up with a plan. 13. Friction fires are easy Anyone who thinks they can ditch a lighter and matches because they know how to make a friction fire is seriously kidding themselves. Practicing friction fire methods during ideal conditions with the right materials is tiring and tricky. In a survival situation things become more complicated when it is windy, raining, snowing, the right materials can’t be found or the right materials are damp, sweat from your nose falls and puts out the ember you had been working, do I need to go on? I love learning “primitive skills,” and friction fire methods are a skill everyone should know. But please, if you are not experienced in them do not kid yourself into thinking they are easy. In the End "Follow Critical Thinking" In this age of instantaneous information, we tend to quickly accept everything as fact. Unfortunately, that is not always the case. Certain information can have some validity to it, but critical thinking skills must always be engaged! Blindly accepting information without a little research and fact checking can lead down a dangerous path, especially in a survival situation. Other interesting articles: Ultralight Survival Kit Design: Best Gear, Tips, and How To 7 Tips For Your Bug Out Bag Quick Tips for Dehydrating Food 10 Tips Everyone Should Know Before Carrying Concealed in 2020

[Review] LWRCI DI: Crme de la Crme AR-15?

[Review] LWRCI DI: Crme de la Crme AR-15?

Trending: Best Places to Buy Ammo Online and [Buyer's Guide] 7 Best AR-15s You may have read our Best AR-15: Complete Buyer’s Guide article (and if you haven’t, you should!) and while all of those rifles are outstanding, some of them deserve a closer look. Number three on that list is the LWRCI’s DI (direct impingement). It is an outstanding rifle, packed with features, and has won the NRA Golden Bullseye Award in 2016 and 2017. I had never fired an LWRCI rifle before and wanted to test the DI out to see if it merited the price tag, reputation, and our ranking. LWRCI DI Rifle. Love that spiral fluted barrel. The short answer is YES but read on if you’d like to know more. Table of Contents Loading... Reputation With a flooded AR-15 market it must be difficult to stand out—yet, LWRCI has established a reputation for manufacturing top-end- feature-rich rifles. The company routinely is listed on the “top AR manufacturer” list and they do this consistently by building quality products at an affordable price when you factor in the features. When LWRCI sent the rifle to Liberty Firearms Institute, I picked it up with anticipation.  It arrived in a burnt bronze Cerakote and I felt somewhat betrayed at first, my loyalty to black intact. LWRCI DI 16" 1500 at Brownells Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 1500 at Brownells Compare prices (2 found) Brownells (See Price) Rainier Arms (See Price) Prices accurate at time of writing My local dealer mentioned something interesting, that he has friends serving with private military contractors (PMC) overseas and he told me those friends love their LWRCI rifles, the DI in particular. It’s funny, you never know where you might find inspiration.  The contractor tidbit struck me with a good idea. Those guys are working in some tough conditions so I would test the rifle out accordingly.  One portion would need to be accuracy but the other could be for close up work. I called my buddy Imri and set up a training session. Combat Force Academy Imri Morgenstern is a former Israeli Defense Force (IDF) Special Forces operator who now teaches people an array of deadly skills from his school, "Combat Force Academy" outside Denver, CO.  As a Master Breacher, he has done a lot of CQB. I spent a day with him wringing out the LWRCI DI. Me! (Sean) training at Combat Force Academy We worked many different drills: barricades, corners, multiple targets, reloads, and other tasks designed to put me through my paces.  The DI handled all this and more with aplomb. The only malfunctions were caused by me, inserting an overfull mag on a closed bolt. Vortex Spitfire 1x optic , also available in 3x magnified I used a Vortex Spitfire 1x as the go-to optic for this portion of the testing.  The 1x has an etched, black, reticle with red or green light-up options too. The unit is designed specifically for AR-15s and it is tough.  Using the Spitfire, I was able to quickly acquire targets and keep both eyes open for better situational awareness. Vortex Spitfire AR 1x Scope 250 at Brownells Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 250 at Brownells Compare prices (3 found) Brownells (See Price) Cabelas (See Price) Palmetto State Armory (See Price) Prices accurate at time of writing Throughout the training exercises, the LWRCI performed flawlessly. We had a bit of rain at the outdoor range. Despite the gun getting wet, muddy, and covered in carbon, it kept shooting.  I would shoot the rifle until empty then break for reloads. The MagPump (for AR-15s) was perfect for keeping me training, 500 rounds went by in no time at all.  Rotating through six magazines I was able to keep my reload breaks short. Loading Mags with the MagPump The DI managed tight corners easily and transitioned between targets well.  A lightweight and compact handguard made the overall maneuverability a pleasure.  Together with the easy handling coupled with the reliability in less than ideal conditions had me realizing why the PMCs were enjoying their LWRCI rifles. It Handles Well, How About Reach? With the short distance and reliability tests complete, I wanted to see how well I could shoot the DI at 100 yards.  I headed out to my local outdoor range after mounting a Vortex Diamondback Tactical 4-12×40 scope. Vortex Diamondback 4-12x40mm Tactical Scope 290 at Amazon Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 290 at Amazon Compare prices (3 found) Amazon (See Price) Brownells (See Price) OpticsPlanet (See Price) Prices accurate at time of writing Both Hornady and Winchester were kind enough to send out some ammo for testing.  I set up at the range after zeroing and slowing began chipping away at 5, five-shot groups for each ammo. Winchester provided 55-grain full metal jacket (FMJ) and Hornady sent along their Black and Frontier brands.  The Hornady Black is a 62-grain FMJ, but the Frontier is a 68-grain boat tail hollow point. (For more AR-15 ammo options, you’ll want to look at the Best AR-15 Ammo: Range & Home Defense article!) I was shooting from a bench using a bipod and squeeze bag.  Conditions started out as ideal but a squirrelly tailwind kicked up to 15-20 MPH and may have had an effect on the final outcomes. Also, I did not clean the IC DI and the bolt was still in the same condition from the 500 + rounds used in the training. Winchester 55gr FMJ shooting 1.22-inch groups at 100 yards All the smallest groups averaged out to 1.46 inches at 100 yards with the smallest being Winchester at 1.22 inches. Total averages for all the groups were closer to 2 inches. Despite the wind kicking up, the Frontier Match ammo remained consistent with its smallest group coming in at 1.42 inches. The Hornady Black came in third at 1.74 inches. She’s All Show and Go! I was really impressed with this rifle.  When I first saw the color, I didn’t love it, but it grew on me.  Now I think it’s gorgeous. When you factor in all the features that come standard with the design aesthetics and flawless functionality of the DI, this rifle is impressive. LWRCI Rifle topped with the Vortex Diamondback in all her glory The LWRCI DI comes with a cold-hammer-forged barrel which is fluted (those beautiful twists) and measures 16.1 inches in a 1:7-inch twist (learn more about AR-15 Twist rates !) and is capped with an A2 flash hider. You might be wondering, why a fluted barrel? Basically, it shaves off weight and allows for faster cooling of the barrel – not something that you find in a run-of-the-mill rifle. My test rifle came with a free-floated M-LOK handguard. I mounted two scopes and a few different accessories to it with no problems. The controls are all truly ambidextrous.  I didn’t care for this but considering some of LWRCI’s clientele, I can understand why they would do it. A great trigger can make or break a rifle and the LWRCI’s is really good , it has the tiniest bit of creep, then snaps with an average pull weight of 6 pounds 1.3 ounces (on Lyman digital trigger gauge provided by Brownells).  It also has a strong reset, I was able to hear it and really feel it. During testing, I shot approximately 700 rounds through the DI.  It was filthy when I finally cleaned it, but it polished up like a gem. The bolt carrier group was largely black but shined up to a nice steel/pewter color showing LWRCI’s attention to detail for using the nickel-boron finish.  The IC DI has a proprietary LWRCI keyless bolt carrier design that is more durable and reliable. LWRC DI Keyless BCG Shooters often pay a premium to reach this higher end of the market.  The finishes, the Magpul furniture, free-float rail, excellent trigger and great accuracy in a pretty light-weight package (6.6 pounds) could easily cost more money than the advertised $1,500. Buying a gun like this means you get a rifle that is beautiful to behold but will run extremely well too—a combination of the best of both worlds. By The Numbers Ergonomics 4/5 I prefer a longer handguard but the one on the DI is fine and I like the narrower diameter.  The Magpul furniture is an excellent choice. While I don’t care for ergonomic controls, they are critical to larger bodies of people who include left-handed shooters. Accuracy 4/5 This is a tough call when you have factors like wind and other variables to contend with.  The DI did an admirable job without the benefit of cleaning or lubrication. I suspect that it is an MOA if not sub-MOA gun when properly applied. Reliability 5/5 This was impressive.  Despite no maintenance during my short test, using different magazines (PMag, Hexmag, old aluminum) I had no failures to fire. Looks 5/5 As mentioned, I did not think I would like the bronze color of the rifle when I first received it.  FDE is often a nightmare of never matching shades but the upper and lower on this gun are beautiful.  The bronze has a metallic flake to it. Also, there is enough black on the gun that any black accessories match up just fine. Price 4/5 Packing this many features into a rifle this affordable is a feat in and of itself.  This is not a $500 AR-15.  This is a rifle that is worth saving your pennies for. Quality, like Freedom, doesn’t come cheap.  You get what you pay for and LWRCI has built it’s business on this premise. Overall 5/5 The DI is an outstanding rifle that is reliable and can withstand the use, abuse, and neglect of a wide range of shooters.  It delivers good accuracy, is simply gorgeous to behold, and will last a very long time. Plus, it has one of the finer owner’s manuals I’ve seen in some time.  This broadens the product’s, use, warnings, and maintenance appeal to a wider audience. LWRCI DI 16" 1500 at Brownells Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 1500 at Brownells Compare prices (2 found) Brownells (See Price) Rainier Arms (See Price) Prices accurate at time of writing Final Thoughts LWRC International made their name in the industry with their piston AR-15s and has cemented their place in the market with their direct-impingement rifles. If you’re looking for a rifle that is truly warfighter quality and is packed with force-multiplying features that you can rely on – then I strongly recommend the LWRCI DI AR-15. Now it’s your turn! What you think of the LWRC DI? Do you use DI or Piston? Burnt Bronze or Tactical Black? Check out our other picks and best upgrades in AR-15: The Definitive Guide .

Overview of 80-Lower.coms 80 percent lowers

Overview of 80-Lower.coms 80 percent lowers

One of the projects I’ve been slowly working on is finally doing my first 80 percent lower. I’m slowly trying to increase the difficulty associated with building weapons and an 80 lower build is the next step. If you’ve gone shopping for 80 percent lowers you’d know that are absolutely tons of them out there for sale. I knew I wasn’t going the polymer route, and I knew I was looking for something to be built in spec. There is a few fly by night 80 lower companies pumping out complete garbage. Forged and Billet lowers Since 80 lowers aren’t firearms anyone can basically make and sell them. This can create a quality gap, which leads to out of spec lowers. A quick Google search revealed this was more common that I thought. I really didn’t want to get stuck with an 80 lower that’s crap because once I mill it a lot of these manufacturers don’t have FFLs. This means I can’t exactly swap it out for a new one. 80-Lowers.com The good news is that I found a legitimate company called 80-Lowers.com. They had a big selection of 80 percent lowers, jigs, tooling, and even full on AR 15 build kits. They also have a good warranty, and a few ways to contact them, so I felt confident. I received a Forged and a Billeted lower a few days later. One thing you got to love about 80 lower receivers is the fact I can have them mailed directly to me. I was pleasantly surprised at the look and appearance of the lowers. The finish is evenly applied, their smooth and blemish free. These models are both marked with Safe and Fire positions for the safety selector. A small detail part of me wanted to have on my 80 percent build. Quality wise from their outside appearance they are in better shape than most Anderson receivers I’ve seen and used. The finish isn’t rough or abrasive in any way. They are definitely high quality lowers. I’m really impressed with the billet lower. Notice the difference in the lines of the Billet and Forged receivers Admittedly this is my first billet lower. It’s a little heavier and nice and beefy. The sharp angles and lines make it unique and give a different appearance. I’m all about breaking from the norm and I think billeted lowers and I have a good future together. Going Dark with 80 Percent Lowers I love the anonymous aspect to 80 percent lowers. I have nothing to hide from the government, heck, I’m writing an article about the rifles I plan to build. However, the 80 percent lower concept gives me hope. The more ways we find to get around ridiculous guns laws the more people will realize just how useless they are. Until then, let’s build some Ghost Guns. The same company sent me a 300 Blackout AR 15 build kit, so stay tuned for a full review. In the meantime check out 80-lower.com

KaBar Big Brother Review: Is it a Good Survival Knife?

The difference between a quality blade and a blade of poor quality can also mean the difference between having a fire and sleeping cold, eating food and going hungry, building a shelter and being in the elements, and it could even mean the difference between life and death. Whether you are wanting a knife for your survival kit , hiking pack, camping gear, or to simply have around, you will want to pick a knife that will survive the elements and the tasks that you have planned for it. In this review we will be going over the Kabar Big Brother to see if it will live up to the expectations that you have for your next knife. Kabar knives manufacture the highest-quality knives . Does this one live up to expectations? In the following sections you will find the knife’s features, some pros and cons of the knife, a set of common questions we get, and what customers have said about the KaBar Big Brother . Let’s get to the review. Quick Navigation KaBar Big Brother Review Size: Steel: Handle: Sheath: Blade: Weight: Pros and Cons of the Kabar Big Brother Pros: Cons: What are People Saying About the KaBar Big Brother? Open Questions About the Kabar Big Brother Verdict KaBar "Big Brother Review" Size: The KaBar Big Brother has a blade length of 9 5/16 inches and an overall length of 14 1/8 inches. Steel: The blade of the KaBar Big Brother is made of 1095 Cro-Van steel. Handle: The handle of the KaBar Big Brother is made of the durable Black Kraton G polymer. Sheath: The sheath included with the KaBar Big Brother is made of thick black leather and is constructed for durability. Blade: The blade is made with a flat grind and has a serrated section on the back of the blade. It is coated with a powdered epoxy and colored black. The blade is fixed. Weight: The KaBar Big Brother weighs 14.4 ounces. Pros and Cons of the Kabar Big Brother Pros: Made of extremely durable 1095 Cro-Van steel Has powder coating for added durability Serrations on back of blade for sawing Blade is made using ‘flat-grind’ technique (not hollow-grinding) Blade is non-reflective Handle is made with Kraton G polymer Made with a long blade Water and corrosion proof Leather sheath is included Handle made with a ‘no-slip’ grip KaBar offers limited lifetime guarantee Strong enough to baton wood Full-Tang construction Cons: Sheath is fairly thin when compared to the weight and size of the knife. Does not come with a lanyard strap Too large for legal carry in some jurisdictions Ka-Bar 2211 KA bar, Kraton Handled Big Brother, Black Blade length: 9 5/16 inch Overall length: 14 1/8 inch See Price on Amazon Last update on 2020-08-14 at 04:48 / Affiliate links / Images from Amazon Product Advertising API What are "People Saying About" the KaBar Big Brother? From what I could find floating around out there, there has been very little negative feedback about the KaBar Big Brother . This thing is a beast. The overall size and weight of the KaBar Big Brother are the first things to notice about this knife. It is reported over and over that this knife is heavy in the hand and big enough to handle the bigger tasks expected of a knife. The next thing that people note is how sharp it is ‘fresh out of the box’. As I stated in the previous section, some others have also noted that laws regarding knives and blades should be researched if you plan to buy the KaBar Big Brother. This is not a small knife. The serrations on this knife are said to work very well for sawing cordage and other materials. It is also reported that the coating used for the blade of this knife is very effective and does not wear or chip too easily. Overall, this knife is said to be well made, to sit comfortably in the hand, and to accomplish more than what is required of it. People are not disappointed with this Kabar knife. "Open Questions About" the Kabar Big Brother Q: What is 1095 Cro-Van steel? A: 1095 Cro-Van steel is a high-carbon steel that has a hardness rating between 1095 and 01. It is made to be similar to 1095 steel but has Chromium, Vanadium, and Molybdenum. The added materials give it a higher carbon content. 1095 Cr0-Van steel is very durable and hard. Q: What is Kraton G? A: Kraton G is the polymer used to make the handle of the KaBar Big Brother. Kraton G polymers are designed to be compatible with a large number of polyolefins and mineral oils. Kraton G is also made to be resistant to UV. Basically, Kraton G is made to resist water, sweat, other chemicals, light, and heavy wear. Q: What does it mean to ‘baton’ wood? A: Batoning is a technique used to cut or chop wood. The blade of the knife is placed on the wood that is to be cut while another piece of wood or other object is used to strike the spine of the knife. This drives the knife into the wood with the goal being to split or cut it. Q: Does this knife has a full tang? A: Yes. The steel that makes up the blade runs the length of the handle as well. The tang is more narrow under the handle, however, making it a ‘stick-tang’ or ‘rat tail-tang’. Verdict The KaBar Big Brother is a great survival knife . The durability is undeniable, as is the quality. This knife can serve in several ways. Some use it as a multi-function survival knife, while others have bought it to serve as a combat knife. The low reflectivity is a plus. The best part about this knife is that there is not really anything, in my opinion, that it cannot be used for. The size and weight of the KaBar Big Brother make it a ‘confidence-booster’ while carrying. This knife is also difficult to damage, which is a huge benefit in the world of survival gear. Overall, the Kabar Big Brother comes highly recommended, and for good reason. This knife is strong, large, and up for the task of aiding you on your journey outdoors, whatever that might be. Ka-Bar 2211 KA bar, Kraton Handled Big Brother, Black Blade length: 9 5/16 inch Overall length: 14 1/8 inch See Price on Amazon Last update on 2020-08-14 at 04:48 / Affiliate links / Images from "Amazon Product Advertising" API Other interesting articles: Kabar Becker BK2 Review: Worthy Survival Knife? Kabar Tanto Review for 2020: Is It Worth As A Survival Knife? Kabar Mule Review for 2020: Good Survival Knife? Let’s Find Out Kabar Short Review: Does It Get the Job Done?

The 4 Best 600 Yard Scopes on the Market – Reviews 2020 Photo by Morning Calm Weekly Newspaper / CC BY For most shooters, six hundred yards is when you begin to leave medium range shooting and graduate to longer range work. At 600 yards, the scopes become more important and more costly, and that is why the use of a proper optic can make all the difference. At six hundred yards, you can still utilize a bullet drop compensator and effectively reduce variable. At 600 yards, you may also start to notice your target isn’t as bright and vivid unless you are utilizing a scope with excellent light transmission. At 600 yards, you are looking for a high-end scope, one capable of doing the work required at 600 yards. Here are, in our humble opinion, the best 600 yard scopes on the market: Nikon M-223 Nikon M-223 2-8x32mm BDC 600 Riflescope Price: Price as of 08/14/2020 03:53 PDT (more info) Product prices and availability are accurate as of the date/time indicated and are subject to change. Any price and availability information displayed on Amazon.com at the time of purchase will apply to the purchase of this product. The Nikon M223 is designed to reach out and touch targets out to 600 meters with ease. It is easy, because the optic is designed with a bullet drop compensator out to 600 yards. The bullet drop compensator places hash marks from one hundred to six hundred yards, and basically does the elevation compensation for you. "The Nikon M223" is designed for the lighter .223 and 5.56mm rounds, these rounds being the most popular in existence and the crowned caliber of the AR series of rifles. The round is also perfect for 600 yard shooting. However, the M223 ( see full specs ) is not stuck to one rifle. The M223 is very easy to use, and is excellent for those just diving into extended range shooting. The M223 is a durable, hearty design that is O-ring sealed to prevent dust, debris, and water from entering the optic. The M223 is also shockproof and can take a beating without stopping. The Nikon M223 also has an ultra clearcoat optical system that provides shooters with a massive amount of light transmission, up to 95 percent. The scope uses a somewhat mid-sized 42mm objective lens, but still achieves that level of light transmission out to six hundred yards and 12 power magnification. The smaller objective lens does allow the scope to use low mounts, which are more precise, and when a scope is mounted low it is often easier to zero. Nikon M-223 Scope Review Watch this video on YouTube

Summary

Trending: Best Places to Buy Ammo Online and [Buyer's Guide] 7 Best AR-15s While the ATF tried to re-categorize the 5. 56 M855 ammo as armor piercing (update: it didn’t work), the heavier hitting military surplus 30-06 M2 AP round is still currently legal at the federal level. Disclaimer: I’m not a lawyer, so check all your federal, state, & local laws.